Top 10 wildflower rock garden plants

Top 10 wildflower rock garden plants

Create a wildflower rock garden with these wildflowers

In this guest blog by Lindsey Jones of the Wildflower Nursery, you’ll find out which plants to use to create your own wildflower rock garden.  Get it right and you’ll be able to do your bit to provide a habitat for Britain’s wildlife! Why not check out the Wildflower Nursery on GardenTags too

A rock garden is a great habitat for a variety of wildlife. Larger rocks are a great place for butterflies to rest on warm sunny days and cracks and crevices provide homes for a wide range of wildlife. Wildflowers planted in a rock garden will attract bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects into your garden. You can buy all 10 of these plants from the Wildflower Nursery on the GardenTags Market too.  Shop now.

Here’s my top 10 perennial British wildflower plants which are drought tolerant, low-growing and are well suited for planting in rock gardens, nooks and crannies, wall crevices and in gaps between pavers.

1.    Wild Basil Clinopodium vulgare 

Wild basil clinopodium vulgareAn excellent nectar plant for bumblebees, other bees, butterflies and many other insects.

Flowers: July-Sept
Height: 10-40cm
Growth Type: Perennial
Position: Full sun to semi-shade
Soil Preference: Calcareous, well drained

 

2.    Cheddar Pink Dianthus gratianopolitanus 

cheddar pink dianthus gratianopolitanusA rare British wildflower, native to the Cheddar Gorge in Somerset, where it grows on the steep limestone cliffs. This is a beautifully scented cottage garden plant and a good nectar plant. Food plant of the Varied Coronet moth and the Lychinis moth.

Flowers: July-Sept
Height: 30-60cm
Growth Type: Perennial
Position: Full sun to semi-shade
Soil Preference: Wide range, preferring calcareous

3. Harebell Campanula rotundifolia

Harebell - Campanula rotundifoliaIt is attractive to Buff-Tailed bumble bee, Common Carder bumblebee, Honeybee, Red Mason bee, Red-tailed bumble bee, White-Tailed bumble bee and Wool-Carder bee and is also the food plant of the Northern Rustic both. Also known as the Bluebell of Scotland 🙂

Flowers: June-Sept
Height: 15-40cm
Growth Type: Perennial
Position: Full sun
Soil Preference: Wide range

4. Maiden Pink Dianthus deltoids

Maiden Pink flowers (Dianthus deltoides)Similar to Cheddar Pink, although smaller and unscented. A good butterfly and moth plant and is the food plant of the Marbled Coronet moth.

Flowers: June-Sept
Height: 0.1-0.5meters
Growth Type: Evergreen perennial for full sun
Position: Full sun
Soil Preference: Wide range, preferring relatively poor soils with good drainage

 

5. Wild Marjoram Origanum vulgare

Marjoram, Wild Origanum vulgareA very attractive nectar and pollen-rich plant for bees, butterflies and other pollinators. Food plant of the Sub-Angled moth, Black Veined moth and Lace Bordered moth. The Small Copper butterfly finds Wild Marjoram very attractive, so by planting it next to Sorrel (it’s food plant), it will encourage them to stay.

Although a great herb for cooking, this is not the more commonly used Pot Marjoram (O.majorana), with paler flowers that is much less hardy.

Flowers: July-Sept
Height: 30-60cm
Growth Type: Perennial
Position: Full sun to semi-shade
Soil Preference: Wide range, preferring calcareous

6. Rock Rose Helianthemun nummularium

Common rock-rose - Helianthemum nummularium.A very good source of pollen and nectar for honeybees, solitary bees, short-tongued bumblebees, and to a lesser extent, long tongued bees. There are several species of small beetle that feed on the foliage. It is the food plant of the Brown Argus, Green Hairstreak and Silver Studded Blue.

Flowers: May-Sept
Height: 5-30cm
Growth Type: Evergreen dwarf shrub
Position: Full sun
Soil Preference: Calcareous

7. Common Toadflax CLinaria vulgaris

Toadflax, Common Linaria vulgarisAlso known as Wild Snapdragon, this is a very good pollen and nectar plant for honeybees, short and long-tongued bumblebee and solitary bees. It is the food plant of the Toadflax Pug moth and the Marbled Clover moth.

Flowers: July to Oct/Nov
Height: 30-80cm
Growth Type: Perennial
Position: Full sun
Soil Preference: Wide range, prefers a well-drained site

8. Thrift Armeria maritime

Thrift Armeria maritimeRich in nectar for bees and butterflies, it is the food plant of the Thrift Clearwing moth and Black-Banded Wave moth. In Welsh it is known as Clustog Fair, meaning Mary’s Pillow in reference to its cushion-like clumps of leaves. It is the county flower of Pembrokeshire, Wales.

Flowers: April-October
Height: 10-30cm
Growth Type: Perennial
Position: Full sun to semi shade
Soil Preference: Acid to neutral

 

9. Wild Thyme Thymus polytrichus

Thyme, Wild Origanum vulgareThis fragrant perennial is an excellent bee attractor. Food plant of the Large Blue butterfly, Tawny Wave, Thyme Pug moth, Annulet, Ashworth’s Rustic and Transparent Burnet moths.

Flowers: May-August
Height: Up to 10cm
Growth Type: Perennial/Very small shrub
Position: Full sun
Soil Preference: Neutral to calcareous

 

10. Wild Clary Salvia verbenaca

Wild Clary Salvia verbenacaRich in nectar, this plant is highly attractive to a wide range of bee species and other pollinating insects. Food plant of the Twin-Spot Carpet moth.
Flowers: June-Aug
Height: 30-45cm
Growth Type: Perennial
Position: Full sun
Soil Preference: Wide range, preferring dry calcareous sites

The Wildflower Nursery have a GardenTags Market members deal. You can buy all 10 of these wildflower rock garden plants for only £29.99! SHOP NOW.

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